How to Save a Damaged Hardwood Floor?

The Ultimate Guidebook on DIY Hardwood Floor Repairs FOR BEGINNERS

Coconix Blog: How to Save a Damaged Hardwood Floor?  The Ultimate Guidebook on DIY Hardwood Floor Repairs FOR BEGINNERS

Hardwood floor damages can be one of the most expensive repairs that you will encounter at home. One simple damage can cost you hundreds to thousands of dollars. It doesn’t matter if you’re the homeowner or the renter, it’s always daunting trying to figure out how to fix it. But there are some really good solutions out there that allow you to do it yourself and save thousands! DIY repair kits can be your go-to in situations like this. They’re easy to use and do the job perfectly! In this guide, we’ll explain the different methods you can use to repair your hardwood flooring based on the damage that has occurred. Damages include minor scratches, stains, and burns.

In this guide, we'll take you through:

1. Identifying your damage.
2. Identifying solutions to fix the damage.
3. Seeing repairs that others have done.
4. Learning how you can fix it yourself.

If this sounds exactly what you're needing, then come along and read this guidebook! If you already know your damage type, you can select your damage type below and skip straight to our detailed instructions for fixing the damage.




SECTION 1: CAN I DIY?

Gauge your Hardwood Floor Damage


Before investing time, money, and effort into DIY repairing your hardwood floor, first, let us help you quickly gauge the damage of your hardwood floor. Below, we have listed both the damages that are DIY repairable and those that are not DIY repairable, for your reference. If your damage fits into the DIY repairable category then you’re in luck! We can provide you a number of different ways to affordably repair your damage. Unfortunately, if you’re on the other side and your damage is a bit more severe, we do recommend that you seek the help of a professional.

 

DIY Repairable Damages


• Surface scratches and scuffs
• Wood scrapes and nicks
• Chips and dents
• Cracks and gaps
• Stain and surface marks
• Holes and knots

Non-DIY Repairable Damages


• Pet urine and other pet accidents
• Buckling and warping
• Cupping and crowning
• Termites



If you’re still umming and ahhing, check out our next section of pros and cons. We layout all the reasons you should do it and some of the not-so-great cons that you might want to also consider! Included is the cost comparison table that we researched and broke down for you to be able to compare the difference between DIY and getting professional help. Seeing how much you’ll save might just hit the nail on the head for you! 

 



SECTION 2: DIY Hard Floor Repair Pros

On Money, Skill, & Convenience


This section will help you decide if DIY is a wise decision or if hiring a professional would be the best option.

 

1. Money-Saver: Professional Repair Cost vs. DIY Cost


DIYing can save you money! It's no secret that it's one of the greatest benefits.  We have laid out the floor repair costs for you below so you can have a greater scope of the repair situation in terms of money. Table 1 below shows the average cost of professional floor repairs compared to the cost of DIY repairs according to the different flooring materials. Table 2 refers to the average costs depending on the damage type.

TABLE 1: Average Cost by Flooring Material

 FLOORING MATERIAL

AVERAGE COST OF PROFESSIONAL REPAIR

AVERAGE DIY REPAIR COST

Laminate

Laminate Flooring

$225 - $400

$19 - $50

(INCLUDING REPAIR TOOLS AND MATERIALS)

Cork

Cork Flooring

$225 - $500

Vinyl

Vinyl Flooring

$225 - $1,000

Bamboo

Bamboo Flooring

$250 - $500

Hardwood

Hardwood Flooring

$250 - $3,000

As seen in Table 1, the average costs for professional repairs range from $225 up to $3,000. Bearing in mind that this is only the average, the price can go up significantly more, depending on the floor damage. The high-cost average is actually pretty normal considering that wood is an expensive flooring material in the first place. It’s a very high maintenance material and needs an extensive care routine in order to keep it damage-free.

TABLE 2: Average Cost by Floor Damage Type

FLOOR DAMAGE TYPE

 AVERAGE COST OF PROFESSIONAL REPAIR

AVERAGE DIY REPAIR COST

SCRATCHES

Hardwood Scratches

$75 - $2,000

$19 - $50

(INCLUDING REPAIR TOOLS AND MATERIALS)

 CHIPS AND DENTS

Hardwood Chips and Dents

$100 - $1,000

CRACKS AND GAPS

Hardwood CRACKS AND GAPS

$200 - $1,000

STAIN AND SURFACE MARKS

Hardwood STAIN AND SURFACE MARKS

$75 - $2,000

HOLES AND KNOTS

Hardwood HOLES AND KNOTS

$100 - $2,000

SQUEAKY FLOORS

Hardwood SQUEAKY FLOORS

$200 - $1,000

DIY REPAIR NOT APPLICABLE

BUBBLING

Hardwood BUBBLING

$225 - $600

BUCKLING

Hardwood BUCKLING

$225 - $3,000

WARPING

Hardwood WARPING

$225 - $3,000

WATER DAMAGE

Hardwood WATER DAMAGE

$225 - $20,000

SUNKEN, UNEVEN, SAGGING FLOOR
SUNKEN, UNEVEN, SAGGING FLOOR

$2,000 - $30,000

As you would imagine, as the floor damage worsens, the average cost per repair increases. Professional repair prices are fairly reasonable if you are looking for quick, hassle-free repairs. You won’t have to worry about setting time aside for the repair, learning how to do the repair beforehand, or finding the tools that you need. But sometimes we just don’t have the money to spare or you just really like the challenge of doing it yourself!

2. Skill & Experience Provider


Two of the most common things you will gain from a DIY repair are skills and experience. As the old saying goes, there is no better teacher than experience. This is good news for any DIYer, home builder or renovator, as you will gain a new skill to add to the basket for all future repairs. You’ll be a professional at repairing hardwood floors in no time!



3. Convenient and Practical Problem Solver


With money-saving factors considered, DIY repairs are also very convenient and can be quite practical and easy problems to solve once you have the know-how. Sometimes, being practical and using your hands to tackle new tasks can be such a nice break from the 9-5 workweek. Plus, it means there’s no need to find a person you can trust to do the job or having to fork out the money. This kit is great for wooden floor repairs and gives you everything you need in the one kit! There’s no need to research any further either once you’ve got the kit and there’s plenty of help available, just click here and reach out to support if you still have unanswered questions after reading this guidebook!







SECTION 3: DIY Hard Floor Repair Cons

On Time & Effort, Repair Results, & Consequences


It’s not always rainbows and butterflies when doing DIY repair projects. Here are some of the cons you should be aware of.

 

1. Time and Effort Required


As most DIY repairs do, DIY floor repairs require time and effort. In order to get the best results possible, giving yourself time and putting in the effort is essential. It can be a difficult task, but the whole point of this repair guide is to give you absolutely all the knowledge you need and also help you to answer any queries you have. We’ve thought of it all! (at least we hope so!!). The team is always here to help and we promise that all your invested time and effort will definitely be worth it!

 

2. Repair Results Can Vary


Things don’t always go as planned especially with DIY repairs. Since these projects vary in difficulty based on the severity of the damage, the repair results can also vary. The repair results may be affected by certain factors like time, attention to detail, following the steps correctly, the products and materials used, temperature and climate, and so on. Many things could go wrong, but that is also true in most things in life. What’s good about this guidebook is that it gives you absolutely all of the information you would need for the repair of your flooring.

 

3. Unexpected Consequences


With DIY repairs, you must also expect the unexpected. There are times that things may go the other way around. When you take the DIY path, you must keep your mind open that things may go terribly wrong. Instead of saving money, there is a chance that the repair would cost you more. Instead of fixing the damage, you may end up worsening the situation. But this can only happen if you allow yourself to be negative and fail to prepare yourself for the repair. Don’t forget that if you’re in doubt, or if things may start to go wrong, you have the entire DIY community and our expert Coconix team to help you get better repair results!

In the next section, we answer some of the commonly asked questions and provide you with an overview of what you will need to prepare or practice for your repair.

 






SECTION 4: Common Hardwood Repair Questions

Two Questions Frequently Asked by Our Customers


If you are here in this section, then it would only mean you have decided to go ahead with DIY. But we know that you might still have a few questions in mind you would like to be addressed. In this section, we have laid out all the frequently asked questions to clear up some that you might have in mind.

 

1. What Skill Level is Required?


With repairing Hardwood Floors, the level of skills required can vary! Below we have created a scaled table so that you can see the damage types and the skills needed. As you may expect, as the damage becomes more severe, so too does the skills needed to repair the damage!  This table will help to give you a better idea of if you can fix the damage yourself! 

 

TABLE 3: Skill Level Required per Damage Type

 REPAIR SKILL LEVEL REQUIRED DIY BEGINNER DIY INTER-
MEDIATE
DIY PRO WOOD PROFESSIONAL
SCRATCHES
CHIPS AND DENTS
CRACKS
STAIN AND SURFACE MARKS
HOLES AND KNOTS
GAPS
BURNS
SQUEAKY FLOORS
BUBBLING
BUCKLING
WARPING
WATER DAMAGE
PET URINE
MOLD AND ROT
TERMITE DAMAGE
CUPPING OR CROWNING EDGES
SUNKEN FLOOR
UNEVEN FLOOR
SAGGING

2. What are the Tools Necessary to Repair Each Damage?


We thought the best way to do this would be by showing you some images of examples damages and explaining the causes and the tools that you would need to complete the repair. We have also highlight the level of experience that is necessary to complete the repair so you can get a better idea of that as well! In the following sections after this you will be able to find all of the instructions for how to repair the different damage types! 

MINOR DAMAGES

Wood Scratches and Marks

1. Scratches And Marks

Cause: Scratches can be caused by simply using a traditional broom or duster instead of a microfiber duster or cloth. Your wood floors might also get scratches from outside debris that is brought inside from your shoes. Not putting welcome mats, as unusual as it sounds, will also eventually lead to scratches and marks. Not using furniture pads can also cause heavy scratches on your hardwood floors. Moreover, your cute furry friends usually cause floor marks with their claws.

Repair Skill Level Required: DIY Beginner

Equipment/Tools/Materials Needed:
DIY Floor repair kit that contains:
Wood putty
Colored repair compound (for color matching and grain pattern creation
Applicator or brush

Other materials you may need: 
Sandpaper
Cloth or rag
Varnish or clear lacquer (for polishing)
Steel wool (for matte wood finish)

Wood Stains and Discoloration

2. Stains And Discolorations

Cause: This type of damage is usually caused by liquid spills, your furry pet’s sweat, stool, and pee, and some types of cleaning products. Ammonia-based cleaners, over-the-counter oil-based soaps, and wax-based cleaning products cause dullness to your hardwood floors. Also, your floor may lose the sheen and evenness in color due to poor finishing techniques. You also have to be aware of some types of wood that are more photosensitive than others, which means they are more likely to be affected by extreme exposure to sunlight. Due to photosensitivity, wood floors may fade in color and change over time.

Repair Skill Level Required:
DIY Beginner - DIY Pro

Equipment/Tools/Materials Needed:
DIY Floor repair kit that contains:
Wood putty
Colored repair compound (for color matching and grain pattern creation)
Applicator or brush

Other materials you may need: 
Sandpaper
Cloth or rag
Varnish or clear lacquer (for polishing)
Steel wool (for matte wood finish)

Wood Dents, Cracks, Gaps, And Chips

3. Dents, Cracks, Gaps, And Chips

Cause: Nails are the most common culprit. Heavy pressure when nailing causes cracks. Chips and dents, on the other hand, are usually caused by accidents like dropping heavy objects.

Repair Skill Level Required:
DIY Beginner - DIY Intermediate

Equipment/Tools/Materials Needed:
DIY Floor repair kit that contains:
Wood putty
Colored repair compound (for color matching and grain pattern creation)
Applicator or brush

Other materials you may need: 
Sandpaper
Cloth or rag
Varnish or clear lacquer (for polishing)
Steel wool (for matte wood finish)

Wood Holes

4. Holes

Cause: Unsightly holes in your wooden floors are usually former nail holes. This can also happen when plugging the nail in the wrong spot.

Repair Skill Level Required:
DIY Beginner - DIY Pro

Equipment/Tools/Materials Needed:
DIY Floor repair kit that contains:
Wood putty
Colored repair compound (for color matching and grain pattern creation)
Applicator or brush

Other materials you may need: 
Sandpaper
Cloth or rag
Varnish or clear lacquer (for polishing)
Steel wool (for matte wood finish)

Wood Knots

5. Knots

Cause: Knots are wood’s imperfection. Wood knots appear in the trunk of a tree where branches have died.

Repair Skill Level Required:
DIY Beginner - DIY Pro

Equipment/Tools/Materials Needed:
DIY Floor repair kit that contains:
Wood putty
Colored repair compound (for color matching and grain pattern creation)
Applicator or brush

Other materials you may need: 
Sandpaper
Cloth or rag
Varnish or clear lacquer (for polishing)
Steel wool (for matte wood finish)

MODERATE DAMAGES

Wood Gaps

1. Gaps

Cause: Abnormally wide gaps typically indicate improper installation. Wood expands during humid weather and contracts during dry periods, so any gaps on your floors will appear larger during some seasons than others. If floorboards were excessively wet during installation, the gaps between them will be wider when they dry.

Repair Skill Level Required:
DIY Intermediate - DIY Pro

Equipment/Tools/Materials Needed:
DIY Floor repair kit that must contain:
Wood putty
Colored repair compound (for color matching and grain pattern creation)
Applicator or brush

Other materials you may need: 
Sandpaper
Cloth or rag
Varnish or clear lacquer (for polishing)
Steel wool (for matte wood finish)

Wood Burns

2. Burns

Cause: This type is not as common as scratches and dents in wood floors. However, burns do occur, especially in kitchens from hot appliances and from fire particles that omit from heat sources such as fireplaces.

Repair Skill Level Required:
DIY Intermediate - DIY Pro

Equipment/Tools/Materials Needed:
DIY Floor repair kit that must contain:
Wood putty
Colored repair compound (for color matching and grain pattern creation)
Applicator or brush

Other materials you may need: 
Sandpaper
Cloth or rag
Varnish or clear lacquer (for polishing)
Steel wool (for matte wood finish)

SEVERE DAMAGES

Squeakiness and Loose Wood Boards

1. Squeakiness and Loose Boards

Cause: Squeaky wooden floors come from loose boards rubbing against each other, nails, or adjacent pipes or ductwork. Loosening is the result of contraction, due to an overly dry indoor atmosphere in winter. Providing a small amount of humidity might help. Loose boards that present a tripping hazard can be fastened in place, from either above or below, by means of concealed screws.

Repair Skill Level Required:
DIY Pro - Floor repair professional

Equipment/Tools/Materials Needed:
If the underlayment only needs to be screwed down more tightly, you will need:
Heavy-duty drill
Subfloor screw gun
Galvanized or coated screws or nails

If there are gaps that need filling, prepare the following:
Wood adhesive
Wood shims

Wood Pet Accidents

2. Pet Accidents

Cause: Pet urine can cause permanent damage to wood floors when not immediately attended to. If the urine stays for any amount of time unattended, the ammonia in the urine will seep into the wood, burning it and turning the wood into black. The waste materials and gases from the decomposing urine create an unpleasant and pungent odor.

Repair Skill Level Required:
Floor repair professional

Equipment/Tools/Materials Needed:
Minor pet damage can be repaired by removing the urine and slowly drying the boards using the following:
Shop vacuum
Squeegee
Stiff brush
Bucket
Rubber gloves
Absorbent cloth
Mild detergent or disinfectant

If the pet damage is too severe, you may have to remove all the flooring, repair or replace the subflooring, and install a brand new floor. 

Wood Warping

3. Warping

Cause: Warping wood floors are often due to extreme temperature or moisture conditions. This can also be caused by exposure to too much water.

Repair Skill Level Required:
Floor repair professional

Equipment/Tools/Materials Needed:
If the warping is only minimal, dry the extra moisture out by using any of the following:
Heavy flat object (box, chest, weights, etc.) to flatten the warping until the moisture dries
Dry towel and a good disinfectant cleaner to dry vacuum the warping
Electric fan to speed up the drying process
Dehumidifier

If warping is severe, prepare the following for replacing the floorboards:
Chalk or grease pencil, Ruler or straight edge, Circular saw, Pry bar, Chisel, Hammer, Towels, Vacuum cleaner, Electric fan, Floor scraper, Replacement planks, spare planks, or natural wood boards, Flooring adhesive or nails, A heavyweight or weights (for placing on the board while the glue is drying)

Wood Mold, Rot, And Odors

4. Mold, Rot, And Odors

Cause: This type of damage is mainly due to extreme exposure to water and moisture. It can also be due to wet subfloor damage.

Repair Skill Level Required:
Floor repair professional

Equipment/Tools/Materials Needed:
Minor water damage can be repaired by removing the water and slowly drying the boards using the following:
Shop vacuum
Squeegee
Stiff brush
Bucket
Rubber gloves
Absorbent cloth
Mild detergent or disinfectant

If the water damage is too severe, you may have to remove all the flooring, repair or replace the subflooring, and install a brand new floor.

Wood Termite Damage

5. Termite Damage

Cause: Termites eat the wood pulp, leaving the wood behind severely compromised. Termite damage on your floors is so severe that your floors may not recover even after the infestation is dealt with.

Repair Skill Level Required:
Floor repair professional

Equipment/Tools/Materials Needed:
You may have to remove all the flooring, repair or replace the subflooring, and install a brand new floor.

Wood Cupped Edges

6. Cupped Edges

Cause: Cupping on wood floors is a form of water damage. Cupped boards are those whose edges are raised higher than their center. This can happen when the wood flooring is installed over a wet subfloor. Also, high relative humidity can be a cause.

Repair Skill Level Required:
Floor repair professional

Equipment/Tools/Materials Needed:
If the cupping is only minimal, dry the extra moisture out by using any of the following:
Heavy flat object (box, chest, weights, etc.) to flatten the cupping until moisture dries
Dry towel and a good disinfectant cleaner to dry vacuum the cupping
Electric fan to speed up drying process
Dehumidifier

If cupping is severe, prepare the following for replacing the floorboards:
Chalk or grease pencil, Ruler or straight edge, Circular saw, Pry bar, Chisel, Hammer, Towels, Vacuum cleaner, Electric fan, Floor scraper, Replacement planks, spare planks, or natural wood boards, Flooring adhesive or nails, A heavyweight or weights (for placing on the board while the glue is drying)

Wood Crowning Edges

7. Crowning Edges

Cause: Crowning is the reverse of cupping, with the center of the board elevating higher than its edges. Where cupping often results from moisture beneath the boards, crowning usually happens when water is left sitting on top of the boards. Crowning can also happen when cupped wood floors are sanded before the moisture is addressed.

Repair Skill Level Required:
Floor repair professional

Equipment/Tools/Materials Needed:
If the crowning  is only minimal, dry the extra moisture out by using any of the following:
Heavy flat object (box, chest, weights, etc.) to flatten the cupping until the moisture dries
Dry towel and a good disinfectant cleaner to dry vacuum the cupping
Electric fan to speed up the drying process
Dehumidifier

If crowning is severe, prepare the following for replacing the floorboards:
Chalk or grease pencil, Ruler or straight edge, Circular saw, Pry bar, Chisel, Hammer, Towels, Vacuum cleaner, Electric fan, Floor scraper, Replacement planks, spare planks, or natural wood boards, Flooring adhesive or nails, A heavyweight or weights (for placing on the board while the glue is drying)

Wood Buckling

8. Buckling

Cause: Buckling is the third and most severe way that wood flooring may react to moisture. When a floor buckles, the boards lift up several inches. Buckling most often results from flooding, but other moisture problems can also cause buckling if the boards were installed too close together and don’t have room to expand, or if the boards were improperly fastened to the floor.

Repair Skill Level Required:
Floor repair professional

Equipment/Tools/Materials Needed:

If the buckling is only minimal, dry the extra moisture out by using any of the following:
Heavy flat object (box, chest, weights, etc.) to flatten the buckling until the moisture dries
Dry towel and a good disinfectant cleaner to dry vacuum the buckling
Electric fan to speed up the drying process
Dehumidifier

If buckling is severe, prepare the following for replacing the floorboards:
Chalk or grease pencil, Ruler or straight edge, Circular saw, Pry bar, Chisel, Hammer, Towels, Vacuum cleaner, Electric fan, Floor scraper, Replacement planks, spare planks, or natural wood boards, Flooring adhesive or nails, A heavyweight or weights (for placing on the board while the glue is drying)

These severe damages are too severe for DIY repair as the repair process needs professional advice and guidance. If you have found your wood floor damage in one of these severe types, then it’s time to call your go-to flooring company or floor professional to fix your wood floor problem.






SECTION 5: How to Repair Hardwood Minor Scratch and Scuffs

Materials Needed & Step-By-Step Process


Carefully follow these step-by-step instructions on how to repair floor damages. If you need repair advice, don't hesitate to contact us!

 

MATERIALS NEEDED:

Wood repair kit: Wood putty, Colored repair compound, Brush, Mixing jar, Spatula
• Microfiber cloth
• Fine brush (if the included brush in the kit is not refined enough)
• Paper towel

STEP-BY-STEP PROCESS:

  1. Start by cleaning the damaged area and removing any debris. Wipe it down with a damp cloth and let it dry thoroughly. 
  2. Apply the repair compound to the damaged area. Use the spatula for larger applications and the brush for surface applications and detail touch-ups. Use a fine brush of your preference if the brush in the kit is too big for details and to recreate any grain patterns.  Smooth out the surface and wipe off the excess with a paper towel. 
  3. Allow several hours to dry until the repair compound is no longer sticky to touch. If needed, apply additional layers until the repaired area is flush with the rest.





SECTION 6: How to Repair Hardwood Stains, Marks, and Discoloration

Materials Needed & Step-By-Step Process


The process for repairing stains and discoloration is pretty much the same as the steps in repairing scratches and scuffs. However, this does not require a fine brush for detailed touch-ups.

 

MATERIALS NEEDED:

Wood repair kit: Wood putty, Colored repair compound, Brush, Mixing jar, Spatula
• Microfiber cloth
• Paper towel

STEP-BY-STEP PROCESS:

  1. Start by cleaning the area and removing any debris. Wipe it down with a damp cloth and let it dry thoroughly. 
  2. Apply the repair compound to the damaged area. Use the spatula for larger applications and the brush for surface applications and detail touch-ups. Smooth out the surface and wipe off the excess with a paper towel. 
  3. Allow several hours to dry until the repair compound is no longer sticky to touch. If needed, apply additional layers until the repaired area is flush with the rest.





SECTION 7: How to Repair Hardwood Holes and Knots

Materials Needed & Step-By-Step Process


Holes and knots usually require wood putty. Find out the repair steps for these types of damage below.

 

MATERIALS NEEDED:

Wood repair kit: Wood putty, Colored repair compound, Brush, Mixing jar, Spatula
• Microfiber cloth
• Thin-tip splinter tweezers
• Sandpaper
• Paper towel

STEP-BY-STEP PROCESS:

  1. Prepare the damaged area by carefully removing paint chips and wood splinters. Clean the area and remove any debris. Wipe it down with a damp cloth and let it dry thoroughly.
  2. For damaged corners or holes wider and deeper than 1/4 of an Inch, first use the wood putty to fill the gap. Cut off the required amount of wood putty and knead it to a uniform color. Apply within 2 minutes after kneading. Press the putty firmly until curing is noticeable. Please do not leave a bulge. For a smooth surface, rub the area with a damp cloth prior to hardening. After 1 hour, the wood putty can be sanded, tapped, and drilled.
  3. Apply the repair compound to the damaged area. First, apply it along the edges and work from the outside to the center to avoid air bubbles. Use the spatula for larger applications and the brush for surface applications and detail touch-ups. Smooth out the surface and wipe off the excess with a paper towel.
  4. Allow several hours to dry until the repair compound is no longer sticky to touch. If needed, apply additional layers until the repaired area is flush with the rest.





SECTION 8: How to Repair Hardwood Cracks, Chips, and Dents

Materials Needed & Step-By-Step Process


The steps for repairing hardwood cracks, chips, and dents are almost similar to the repair steps for holes and knots. Carefully follow the instructions below and contact us for any questions you might have during the process. 

 

MATERIALS NEEDED:

Wood repair kit: Wood putty, Colored repair compound, Brush, Mixing jar, Spatula
• Microfiber cloth
• Thin-tip splinter tweezers
• Sandpaper
• Paper towel

STEP-BY-STEP PROCESS:

  1. Prepare the area by carefully removing paint chips, splinters, and debris. Wipe down the area with a damp cloth and let it dry thoroughly. 
  2. For cracks or chips wider and deeper than 1/4 of an Inch, first use the wood putty to fill the gap. Cut off the required amount of wood putty and knead it to a uniform color. Apply within 2 minutes after kneading. Press the putty firmly until curing is noticeable. Do not leave a bulge. For a smooth surface, rub the area with a damp cloth prior to hardening. After 1 hour, wood putty can be sanded, tapped, and drilled. 
  3. Apply the repair compound to the damaged area. First, apply it along the edges and work from the outside to the center to avoid air bubbles. Use the spatula for larger applications and the brush for surface applications and detail touch-ups. Smooth out the surface and wipe off the excess with a paper towel.





SECTION 9: Matching Your Wood Color and Creating Grain Patterns

Color Matching Steps & The Color Mixing Guide


One of the most important things you should be able to do correctly in a DIY wood repair project is the color matching part. Hardwood floors vary in type, finish, styles, color, and a lot more. We’ve listed some helpful color matching tips you could use when doing your DIY wood repair project.

 

1. KNOW YOUR BASE COLOR


When trying to decipher the base color of your hardwood flooring it's important to look past the grain pattern and look for the underlying shade. Often times we will overlook the base color of the wood and mistake it for the color of the grain. 

In the image below, you can see that the base color is lighter than the grain patterns. Sometimes, floorboards look like they have different tones but actually, the darker-looking boards just have more patterns in them. Grain patterns are usually dark in color or one to two shades darker than their base color. Study the image below to find out the difference between the two. Knowing the true base color of your wood will definitely help you in creating your base color mixture. With Coconix, you can use the colors provided to mix and create exactly the colors that you will need to match your wood. You will also be able to use our pre-mixed colors if your wood color is one of the most common ones like walnut, mahogany, maple, oak, and cherry.

 
Wood Color Matching And Grain Pattern Creation

2. BEFRIEND YOUR COLOR CHART


You might have a difficult time mixing and matching if you do not understand how the color chart included in your wood repair kit works. While reading this portion, it’s best to have your wood color chart ready with you!

On the Color Mixing Guide portion of your repair kit manual which is shown below, you will see colors with labels on the left side and colors with labels on the bottom part. Look for the best base color match of your wood floor or wood furniture across the colors on the grids. Once you have found the perfect color match, follow the grid on a horizontal line to the left to know your main color. Then, follow the grid in a vertical line to the bottom to look up your secondary color. There are times that you would only need one color, especially when your wood floor or furniture perfectly matches one of the repair compounds in the kit. You will see the meaning of the color labels at the bottom portion where the color legends are indicated. Your Color Mixing Guide also has easy instructions if ever you get confused along the way. On the lower right corner of your Color Mixing Guide is where you will find how to contact us in case you need further help with color matching.

 
Coconix Floor & Furniture Color Mixing Guide

3. ADJUST YOUR COLOR MIXTURE


When mixing your base color, you will have to use the two key colors in wood color matching: Black and White. These two repair compound colors will help you adjust the tint of your base color mixture. It is also very important to remember that you only have to add tiny amounts of black or white at a time. BE REMINDED, A LITTLE AMOUNT GOES A LONG WAY!

 

4. PRACTICE YOUR PATTERN


After getting the perfect color mixture for your wood base color, you will have to practice doing the grains or patterns on your wood. Most of the wood patterns can be recreated by using Mahogany, Walnut, or Black. Of course, it will still depend on your wood pattern’s color so you must identify which perfectly matches its color. Then, you may try doing the pattern using the brush included in the kit. Don’t be afraid to experiment on this step. The more you practice, the more you’ll be familiar with your wood’s grain or pattern and how to perfectly copy it. The saying “practice makes perfect” never gets old.

 



SECTION 10: 5 Incredible Before & After Repair Results

Wood Repair Result Photos


The following images and testimonies from Coconix customers will help you believe that DIY wood repair can be easy, fun, and possible! The results will truly amaze you and will surely give you confidence in starting your own DIY wood repair project.

 
5 Incredible Before & After Coconix Repair Results

1. “The best product to use to repair a finished wood floor”

by Jeff on Oct 04, 2019

"I purchased this product to repair the scratch and clawing damage caused by my new puppy on my pre-finished wood floor. The pictures that are shown are just with the colorant applied. This product is excellent for a indistinguishable repair, but you must be patient and take your time. After you make some test colors and contact Coconix for their color mixing suggestions, you will get used to using this product. Purchase the kit, and send the picture off to Coconix with a description of the damage. And take your time to get the best results. Coconix will provide you with the assistance to get a great repair!"

5 Incredible Before & After Coconix Repair Results

2. “Best kit I have used! Protip: get cheap fine tip pens to create wood grain look”

by kayoss on Oct 02, 2019

"
This is the third wood repair/ scratch repair kit I’ve used and by FAR the best.

I have bamboo flooring and there was a nasty scratch where a drunk friend rolled a computer chair over the floor. Horrified at the scratches I decided to try this repair kit. Wow!! I can’t believe how much better! "

5 Incredible Before & After Coconix Repair Results

3. “Saved our floor!”

by Daizy4070 on Feb 08, 2021

“Loooovvveed the color selection and easy to use. We had a mystery spot appear that stripped the laminate. To this day, we still have no idea what spilled and we tried just about everything before we ordered this. The spot was resistant to everything-wood marker, crayon, etc. I highly recommend getting a cheap brush set, as others have mentioned the brush that comes with it is useless. Also, don't be afraid to mix colors, even if you don't think your wood contains that color. You would be surprised at the combos I tried on a paper plate beforehand that worked. Use a thin coat, let dry completely and then come back and put on a thicker coat. I also did a bit of "freehand" at the end to give it more swirls and we're thrilled with the result!”

5 Incredible Before & After Coconix Repair Results

4. “Super Amazon Seller!”

by Jack C Underwood on Jun 08, 2019

“Mixing container keeps everything ready to use as you blend the product to match. The products and support are great. HIGHLY RECOMMEND”

5 Incredible Before & After Coconix Repair Results

5. “It looks a lot better!!!”

by Nathaniel J Daniels on Aug 02, 2020

“I really love this product, I posted pictures before and after one application. It already looks a lot better. I would definitely recommend this to my friends. My hardwood floor has different types of shades, I used only the color Walnut, I may try to mix more colors next time. You may notice it, but I am sure your guests won’t.”




DIY wood repair is not a piece of cake. But with the right tools and materials, the right wood repair kit, and this ultimate guidebook, you will surely get the repair results you are looking for. And the most important thing is that you have our Coconix Support Team to assist you and to answer any questions that you may have before, during, and after your repair project.




SECTION 11: BONUS!

How To Clean And Disinfect Your Home Without Damaging Your Floors


COVID-19 has caused many of us to remain at home to help prevent the spread of the virus. While at home, it’s a great time to clean and disinfect your home. However, there is a big difference between simply cleaning and disinfecting your home. Cleaning helps to remove germs, bacteria, and viruses but does not kill them, though this does lower the risk of spreading infection. Disinfecting uses chemicals to kill germs on surfaces. This does not necessarily clean dirt or remove these germs, so it is always best to clean first and then disinfect to lower the risk of spread. Good thing, when it comes to flooring, disinfecting is rarely necessary in any case. CDC studies have shown that disinfecting floors has minimal impact beyond regular cleaning. However, it wouldn’t hurt much if you go ahead and disinfect your wood floors after cleaning them.

 


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